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Goal: 30,000 Progress: 10,162
Sponsored by: The Breast Cancer Site

Getting a mastectomy is a life- and body-changing event for breast cancer survivors. In today's always-online world, it's natural that survivors who have endured a mastectomy would like to share their “battle scars” with friends and family on social media.

Facebook is very clear that they do, in fact, allow post-mastectomy photos. Their Help Center states, "We agree that undergoing a mastectomy is a life-changing experience and that sharing photos can help raise awareness about breast cancer and support the men and women facing a diagnosis, undergoing treatment or living with the scars of cancer. The vast majority of these kinds of photos are compliant with our policies."

But in practice, many breast cancer survivors have experienced the shame and outrage of having posted a post-mastectomy photo only to have it flagged as inappropriate content.

Why does this happen?

Facebook allows users to flag images for offensive content, and the website's algorithm usually removes the image without considering context. Cancer survivors have to go through the hassle of disputing the automatic removal of their image, despite the fact that Facebook's Terms of Service is very clear that post-mastectomy images are allowed on the site.

Facebook needs to stop its blanket approach to banning images. They need to have real people decide what images should and should not be banned. Breast cancer survivors should not have to fight to post what Facebook has already said is allowed on their website!

Sign Here






Dear Mark Zuckerberg,

It has come to my attention that many breast cancer survivors are feeling persecuted and silenced after they attempt to share post-mastectomy pictures on your website. Facebook's policy on this is clear. The Help Center states, "We agree that undergoing a mastectomy is a life-changing experience and that sharing photos can help raise awareness about breast cancer and support the men and women facing a diagnosis, undergoing treatment or living with the scars of cancer. The vast majority of these kinds of photos are compliant with our policies."

Breast cancer survivors, however, are often not having experiences that align with this stated policy. Too many survivors have shared post-mastectomy photos only to have the images be flagged and removed by Facebook's algorithm. To get their images back online, survivors have to go through a tedious customer support system. This is not something they should have to do. Furthermore, no survivor should have to go through the pain and anguish of having a banned image imply that their body is somehow inadequate or unacceptable. Cancer is hard enough. Post-mastectomy pictures are a way for survivors to bring awareness to the disease, and also bring to light the strength and indomitable spirit needed to endure it.

Mr. Zuckerberg, please spearhead a revision of Facebook's system for banning images. Flagged images should have a human making judgement calls before they are removed from the site. Doing so would save many breast cancer survivors countless hours of stress and shame that Facebook agrees they should not have experienced in the first place.

Thank you for your help,

Petition Signatures


Jul 19, 2018 Cyndi Burwell There is nothing wrong with scars, be they on arms, legs or the chest. We see pictures of mens bare chests on Facebook so I see nothing wrong with pictures of mastectomy scars.
Jul 15, 2018 Richard Rheder
Jul 14, 2018 Cheryl Martin
Jul 14, 2018 Constance Warner
Jul 9, 2018 Helena Moore
Jul 8, 2018 Diane Gravette
Jul 7, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jul 7, 2018 Vicky Snow
Jul 7, 2018 Vikki Boyde
Jul 6, 2018 Renee McKenzie
Jul 6, 2018 Stacy Ping
Jul 5, 2018 Natalie Batich
Jul 5, 2018 Debra Baker
Jul 5, 2018 (Name not displayed) I was diagnosed with breast cancer one year ago. I had bilateral masectomy but unfortunately had reconstruction surgery at same time. I was so confused,stressed,drained mentally I thought that was what I wanted. i don’t like them!
Jul 3, 2018 Jennifer Beaulieu
Jul 1, 2018 Christina Lewis
Jul 1, 2018 Marie Skoczen These photos are very educational for those who are about to go through something like this
Jun 23, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jun 23, 2018 Leora Yaffi
Jun 22, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jun 18, 2018 Shelby Fry
Jun 16, 2018 Carol Painter
Jun 13, 2018 (Name not displayed) the scars are our battle wounds for fighting a hard fight - don't censor that.
Jun 12, 2018 Deborah B Green-Bryant Be proud to be a survivor. Let the world know!
Jun 12, 2018 Michelle Dybas
Jun 12, 2018 Carmen G. Bush
Jun 12, 2018 (Name not displayed) I just recently had my right breast removed due to breast cancer. Showing what happened to me is a way to help me deal with breast cancer. Luckily they got all.my cancer and it was nonavasive.
Jun 12, 2018 Annie Robinson
Jun 11, 2018 olga Zhukova
Jun 11, 2018 Kari Lindewirth
Jun 11, 2018 Patricia A Ellis I am a 30-year breast cancer survivor with lumpectomy scars. I consider these battle scars - not pornography.
Jun 11, 2018 Patricia Walker I had a Lumpectomy almost 4 years ago today, I have scar's, but those scars remind me that I beat this and I know that the women who have had mastectomies went through way more than me, so why not let them share their scars, and share their experience.
Jun 10, 2018 Dennis Kreiner
Jun 10, 2018 Barbara Garcia
Jun 10, 2018 Pat Adams
Jun 10, 2018 Sandra Sweetwood
Jun 10, 2018 Sabrina Mulrooney
Jun 10, 2018 Kristin Riebenack
Jun 10, 2018 Christine Reinecke
Jun 10, 2018 Cathrine Cheney I agree with what you've said after losing my aunt in 2010 to breast cancer and I also support the NRA and Facebook does the same thing about posting things with them too. Thank you for standing up to them.
Jun 10, 2018 NOEL HART
Jun 10, 2018 Lisa A Reimold
Jun 8, 2018 Jacqueline DuFoe
Jun 8, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jun 8, 2018 Gillian Bown
Jun 8, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jun 8, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jun 8, 2018 (Name not displayed)
Jun 8, 2018 Tom Zelinski Views of the body depend on the respect shown and the purpose for showing. Spreading knowledge about medical issues is certainly a valuable reason for showing body parts.
Jun 7, 2018 Marcia Ayres

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